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Faculty Directory

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Bradley R. Adams Bradley R. Adams
Associate Professor

Ph.D. University of Utah

Faculty Profile

Office: 360I EB
Office Phone: 801-422-6545
Email: brad.adams [at] byu.edu

Office Hours: MWF 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm; Th 2:00 pm - 2:00 pm; Also Available by Appointment
Research Topics:

Combustion Simulations, Radiative Heat Transfer, Advanced Energy Systems

Background:

Bradley Adams joined BYU in 2015 after 30 years in industry, including positions at GenRad, MIT Lincoln Laboratories, and Reaction Engineering International. He has significant experience in technical management and has performed R&D in the areas of heat transfer, combustion, and air pollution control, with an emphasis on CFD simulation of these processes. Current research interests include advanced power generation systems (e.g., oxy-fuel combustion, chemical looping), radiative heat transfer, and multi-physics simulations. He received B.S. and M.S. degrees in Mechanical Engineering from BYU and a Ph.D. degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Utah.

Jonathan D. Blotter Jonathan D. Blotter
Professor

Ph.D. Virginia Tech

Faculty Profile

Office: 350P EB
Office Phone: 801-422-7820
Email: jblotter [at] byu.edu

Office Hours: By Appointment
Research Topics:

Structural Dynamics, Vibration, Acoustics, Noise Control, Vibration Control

Background:

Jon Blotter has focused research in structural dynamics, vibration, and acoustics. Areas of currently funded research include vibration control, noise control, energy based vibration and acoustic control, and rocket noise. Dr. Blotter helped developed the BYU Acoustics Research Group that now consists of 4 full-time faculty members in Mechanical Engineering and Physics and consists of approximately 30 graduate and undergraduate students. BYU has exceptional facilities consisting of anechoic and reverberant chambers, multiple scanning laser Doppler vibrometers, computer modeling software, and test equipment.

Link: BYU Acoustics Research Group
Anton E. Bowden Anton E. Bowden
Professor and Graduate Coordinator

Ph.D. University of Utah

Faculty Profile

Office: 350K EB
Office Phone: 801-422-4760
Email: abowden [at] byu.edu

Office Hours: MWF 1:00pm - 2:00 pm,
Office Hours: By Appointment. Reservations can be made at https://antonbowden.youcanbook.me
Research Topics:

Spine Biomechanics, Orthopaedic Biomechanics, Soft Tissue Material Characterization, Medical Device Design, Non-linear Finite Element Analysis, Medical Imaging, Polymer Constitutive Behavior, Computational Biomechanics

Background:

Anton E. Bowden loves BYU and especially his interactions with the students in the Mechanical Engineering Department!  His background and research interests are in spinal biomechanics, biomedical device design, computational biomechanics, and engineering leadership education.  He directs the BYU Applied Biomechanics Engineering Laboratory.  He received his PhD in Bioengineering from University of Utah and his BS in Mechanical Engineering from Utah State University.  He is a licensed professional engineer and a recipient of a National Science Foundation CAREER Award.  He is grateful to have been awarded the Weidman Professorship in Leadership and enjoys serving in various committee capacities for the Orthopaedic Research Society.  He currently advises the BYU Biomedical Engineering Club.  He speaks Spanish with moderate fluency and is currently trying to learn Mandarin Chinese.  He and his wife Jennifer love learning from their four children and live in Lindon, Utah.

Link: BYU Applied Biomechanics Engineering Laboratory
Steven Charles Steven K. Charles
Associate Professor

Ph.D. Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology

Faculty Profile

Office: 350J EB
Office Phone: 801-422-7369
Email: skcharles [at] byu.edu

Office Hours: Mon 2-3pm, Wed 3-4pm, Fri 4-5pm
Research Topics:

Biomechanics and neural control of movement, movement disorders, technology for assisting and rehabilitating patients with movement disorders

Background:

Steven K. Charles is an Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering and a faculty member in BYU's Neuroscience Center. As a biomedical engineer, Steven investigates how humans control their movements, what goes wrong in movement disorders, and how to use technology to help patients with movement disorders. His interdisciplinary research lies at the intersection of engineering, neuroscience and rehabilitation. Before coming to BYU in 2010, Steven investigated the movement impairments of patients with cerebellar ataxia as a post-doctoral research fellow at Johns Hopkins University. While completing his Ph.D. in Mechanical and Medical Engineering from the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Steven characterized human wrist movement behavior to set a baseline for robotic rehabilitation of wrist movements in stroke patients. Before his doctoral studies, he obtained an M.S. degree from MIT and a B.S. degree from Brigham Young University, both in Mechanical Engineering.

Link: Neuromechanics Research Group
Mark Colton Mark B. Colton
Associate Professor and Undergraduate Coordinator

Ph.D. University of Utah

Faculty Profile

Office: 350I EB
Office Phone: 801-422-6303
Email: colton [at] byu.edu

Office Hours: By Appointment
Research Topics:

Robotics, Haptic Interfaces, Mechatronic Systems, Dynamic Systems

Background:

Mark Colton received his PhD in mechanical engineering from the University of Utah, with an emphasis on haptic interfaces. While completing his PhD, he served as a Visiting Instructor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Brigham Young University. Professor Colton previously received an MS degree from the University of Utah while working for the Center for Engineering Design on the design and control of neuro-prosthetic arms. He worked for Sarcos, Inc. on various research and entertainment robotics projects. His interests include mechatronics, dynamic systems, haptic interfaces, and robotics.

Douglas Cook
Assistant Professor

Ph.D. Purdue University

Faculty Profile

Office: 360P EB
Office Phone: 801-422-0193
Email: d.cook [at] byu.edu
Research Topics:

Crop Biomechanics

Background:

Dr. Cook earned a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from Utah State along with minors in mathematics and Mandarin Chinese. He received Masters and PhD degrees in mechanical engineering from Purdue University.
His research has been supported by grants from the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Agriculture, and industry. His research findings have been published fields as diverse as acoustics, biomechanics, biomedical engineering, agronomy, medicine, and botany.

Nathan Crane
Professor

Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Faculty Profile

Office: 360Q EB
Office Phone: 801-422-7731
Email: nbcrane [at] byu.edu
Research Topics:

Additive Manufacturing (AM), powder metallurgy, electrowetting, wetting transitions on textured surfaces, and surface tension driven microfluidics

Background:

Nathan Crane joined the faculty of BYU as professor of mechanical engineering in 2018 after 12 years at the University of South Florida.  Dr. Crane completed a Ph.D. degree in Mechanical Engineering with a minor in Materials Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2005 and earned his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Mechanical Engineering at Brigham Young University in Provo, UT in 1998 and 1999 respectively.  He has enjoyed solving problems in industry (Caldera Engineering and Pratt and Whitney Aircraft) government (Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratories), and academia.  Dr. Crane also has experience as an expert witness in intellectual property issues.

Dr. Crane’s interests lay in the areas of design, materials and advanced manufacturing with a particular interest in additive manufacturing (AM) and digital microfluidics.  His work focuses on applying material science, mechanical design, and processing science to enable novel manufacturing processes.  Examples of recent projects include area-based AM through projection sintering, AM of radio-frequency (RF) electronics, microscale actuation using droplet microfluidics, biodegradation of magnesium, wetting transitions in textured surfaces and capillary self-assembly. His work has been recognized with an NSF graduate research fellowship, the 2005 Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium (SFF) Best Paper Award, a 2014 Fulbright Scholar, and a 2015 USF Outstanding Faculty Award. 

Julie Crockett Julie Crockett
Associate Professor

Ph.D. University of California, San Diego

Faculty Profile

Office: 350C EB
Office Phone: 801-422-2232
Email: crockettj [at] byu.edu

Office Hours: By Appointment
Research Topics:

Fluid Mechanics, Environmental Fluid Dynamics, Computational Methods and Analysis

Background:

Julie Crockett came to BYU in 2007. She received her Bachelors degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Denver, and Masters and Ph.D. degrees from the University of California, San Diego. Her research interests are in areas of fluid dynamics, including environmental flows, which are often characterized by fluids of differing densities, and passive drag reduction mechanisms. She is interested in the effect of internal waves on global circulations in the ocean and atmosphere in addition to energy harvesting. She uses theory, computational fluid dynamics, experimentation, and ocean data as a part of her research. She has also spent time at sea collecting data for studying internal waves in the ocean.  She is also interested in the fundamentals of heat transfer through and flow dynamics over micro-structured surfaces which have the capability of reducing friction drag.

Link: Fluids and Thermal Transport Lab
Link: Internal Waves Lab
Link: Lab youtube channel
Link: BYU SH article
Link: CNN article
Link: BYU Waves article
David T. Fullwood David T. Fullwood
Professor

Ph.D. University of London

Faculty Profile

Office: 350N EB
Office Phone: 801-422-6316
Email: dfullwood [at] byu.edu

Office Hours: By appointment
Research Topics:

Composites, Nano-composites, Microscopy, Computational Methods in Materials Science

Background:

David Fullwood is a member of the Materials group in the Mechanical Engineering Department at BYU. Following his PhD in mathematics he spent 12 years working for the nuclear industry in the UK. As Head of R&D and Head of Mechanical Engineering he developed high-speed energy storage flywheels based on novel composites for two spin-off companies. The result was the most high-tech flywheel available, with applications on the NY Metro, a Fuji wind farm and other areas requiring energy smoothing. Dr Fullwood returned to academia in 2004, with a brief spell at Drexel University followed by his current position at BYU. He now focuses on composites / nano-composites, microscopy and computational methods in materials science.

Link: Research Group
Steven E. Gorrell Steven E. Gorrell
Associate Professor

Ph.D. Iowa State University

Faculty Profile

Office: 350D EB
Office Phone: 801-422-2759
Email: sgorrell [at] byu.edu

Office Hours: M,W,Th,F 3:00pm - 4:00pm,
Office Hours: T 2:30pm - 3:30pm,
Office Hours: or by appointment
Research Topics:

Experimental and Computational Fluid Dynamics, Turbomachinery, Computational Science and Engineering, Engineering Education

Background:

Dr. Steve Gorrell joined the BYU Mechanical Engineering Department in 2007 following an eighteen year career as an Aerospace Engineer at the Air Force Research Laboratory Propulsion Directorate. Dr. Gorrell is an internationally recognized leader in the use of high performance computing (HPC), hi-fidelity time-accurate CFD, and Particle Image Velocimetry to investigate and understand unsteady flow physics in high performance gas turbine engine fans and compressors.

Dr. Gorrell has published 57 journal and conference papers on unsteady turbomachinery aerodynamics and has given 25 invited lectures, including presentations to the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board, the MIT Gas Turbine Laboratory, and numerous distinguished visitors to the Aeronautical Systems Center Major Shared Resource Center at Wright-Patterson AFB. He is a member of the ASME International Gas Turbine Institute Turbomachinery Committee, an Associate Fellow of the AIAA, Chair of the AIAA Professional Member Education Committee, and member of the AIAA Gas Turbine Engine Technical Committee.

Eric R. Homer Eric R. Homer
Associate Professor

Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Faculty Profile

Office: 350L EB
Office Phone: 801-422-4462
Email: eric.homer [at] byu.edu
Research Topics:

Materials Modeling, Grain Boundary Structure-Property Relationships, Mechanical Behavior of Polycrystalline Metals

Background:

Eric R. Homer is an Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering with research and teaching emphases in Materials Science & Engineering. As a Materials Scientist and Mechanical Engineer, Eric investigates how the atomic- and micro-scale structure of materials affects their macroscopic properties that can be used in the design and construction of engineering structures. His main research focus is in computational materials science where he has developed models and software to simulate a variety of material phenomena. Prior to joining the faculty at BYU in 2011, Eric researched grain boundary migration and microstructure evolution as a postdoctoral researcher in the Computational Materials Science & Engineering Department at Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque, NM). While completing his Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Eric examined the process of shear banding in amorphous metals and was awarded the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowship. Eric's love of BYU began with his time pursuing B.S. and M.S. degrees in Mechanical Engineering at Brigham Young University.

Link: Research Website
Howell Larry Larry L. Howell
Professor and Associate Dean

Ph.D. Purdue University

Faculty Profile

Office: 240J EB
Office Phone: 801-422-8037
Email: lhowell [at] byu.edu

Office Hours: By Appointment
Research Topics:

Compliant Mechanisms, including Origami-Inspired Mechanisms, Microelectromechanical Systems, Medical Devices, and Compliant Space Mechanisms

Background:

Larry L Howell is an Associate Dean and Professor at Brigham Young University (BYU). Prof. Howell received his B.S. degree from BYU and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Purdue University. Prior to joining BYU in 1994 he was a visiting professor at Purdue University, a finite element analysis consultant for Engineering Methods, Inc., and an engineer on the design of the YF-22 (the prototype for the U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptor). He is a Fellow of ASME, past chair of the ASME Mechanisms & Robotics Committee, and has been associate editor for the Journal of Mechanisms & Robotics and the Journal of Mechanical Design. He is the recipient of the ASME Machine Design Award, ASME Mechanisms & Robotics Award, Theodore von Kármán Fellowship, NSF Career Award, Purdue Outstanding Mechanical Engineer (alumni award), and the BYU Karl G. Maeser Distinguished Lecturer Award (BYU’s highest faculty award). 

Prof. Howell’s research focuses on compliant mechanisms, including origami-inspired mechanisms, space mechanisms, microelectromechanical systems, and medical devices. He is the co-editor of the Handbook of Compliant Mechanisms and the author of Compliant Mechanisms which are published in both English and Chinese. His lab’s work has also been reported in popular venues such as Newsweek, Scientific American, Popular Science, and the PBS documentary program NOVA.​ 

Link: Compliant Mechanisms Research
Brian Iverson Brian D. Iverson
Assistant Professor

Ph.D. Purdue University

Faculty Profile

Office: 360J EB
Office Phone: 801-422-7514
Email: bdiverson [at] byu.edu

Office Hours: Available by Appointment
Research Topics:

Heat Transfer, Microscale Transport, Solar-Thermal Energy, Thermal Energy Storage

Background:

Brian D. Iverson joined the faculty at Brigham Young University in 2012 and received an NSF CAREER Award in 2018 for his work in radiative cooling. His current interests include heat and mass transfer involving high aspect ratio structures for use in sensors, energy and thermal management applications.  Prior to his current position, he worked as a senior member of the technical staff at Sandia National Laboratories. While there his research included thermal storage integration in trough solar-thermal power plants, supercritical CO2 Brayton cycles for solar, thermocline energy storage, flux sensors for closed-loop tracking, among others. He has analyzed transport and interfacial phenomena in thermal, energy and bio-systems and worked as a post-doctoral researcher at Purdue University. He completed his PhD in 2008 while investigating integrated micropumping techniques for electronics cooling and biodevices as a part of the Cooling Technologies Research Center also at Purdue. His micropumping work includes actuation techniques such as induction-type electrohydrodynamics and electroosmotic pumping. He obtained an MS degree in 2004 while studying wick structure performance and properties in flat heat pipes. He is also a graduate of Brigham Young University (BS 2002).

Link: Flux Lab - Research Site
Link: LinkedIn Profile
Link: Google Scholar Profile
Link: ORCiD ID
Brian D. Jensen Brian D. Jensen
Professor

Ph.D. University of Michigan

Faculty Profile

Office: 350G EB
Office Phone: 801-422-6030
Email: bdjensen [at] byu.edu

Office Hours: By Appointment
Research Topics:

Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) and Biological MEMS, Electrical Contacts, Modeling of Systems in Diverse Energy Domains

Background:

Brian D. Jensen received B.S. and M.S. degrees in mechanical engineering from Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, in 1996 and 1998, respectively. He received an M.S. degree in electrical engineering and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, in 2004. In 1998 and 1999, he spent sixteen months as a micro mechanism designer at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM. He has performed research and published papers in a wide variety of design topics, including microelectromechanical systems and compliant mechanisms. He was also the recipient of a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship and a Department of Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship.

Oliver K. Johnson Oliver K. Johnson
Assistant Professor

Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Faculty Profile

Office: 350M EB
Office Phone: 801-422-0972
Email: ojohnson [at] byu.edu

Office Hours: By Appointment
Research Topics:

Microstructure Design; Grain Boundary Networks; Microstructure-Properties Models; Multi-scale Modelling & Homogenization; Synthesis of Advanced Materials;

Background:

Oliver K. Johnson joined the faculty of the BYU Mechanical Engineering Department in 2015. His research incorporates theoretical, computational, and experimental approaches to design and synthesize advanced materials. Areas of particular interest include the design of defect networks in hard materials, experimental and theoretical methods for quantifying structure-property correlations, and synthesis of designed microstructures. Dr. Johnson is a recipient of the National Science Foundation CAREER Award. Before coming to BYU, Dr. Johnson received the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) and completed his PhD in Materials Science and Engineering at MIT. He also received a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from BYU.

Link: Research Website
Matthew R. Jones Matthew R. Jones
Associate Professor

Ph.D. University of Illinois at Urbana

Faculty Profile

Office: 360H EB
Office Phone: 801-422-3070
Email: mrjones [at] byu.edu

Office Hours: By appointment only. Please email mrjones [at] byu.edu and suggest several times your are available.
Research Topics:

Heat Transfer, Thermodynamics, Reduced Order Modeling, Biomass Cookstoves, Thermophysical Property Measurement

Background:

Matthew R. Jones an Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at BYU where he teaches courses in the areas of heat transfer and thermodynamics. Currently, he is involved in research projects related to reduced order modeling of thermal processes; analysis, design and optimization of clean-burning, fuel-efficient, modular biomass cookstoves, power harvesting, optical fiber thermometry and measurement of thermophysical properties. Prior to coming to BYU, he was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering at The University of Arizona, and a Science and Technology Agency Fellow at the Mechanical Engineering Laboratory in Tsukuba, Japan. Professor Jones has also held research appointments at the Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA) and at Argonne National Laboratory.

Marc D. Killpack Marc D. Killpack
Assistant Professor

Ph.D. Georgia Institute of Technology

Faculty Profile

Office: 360E EB
Office Phone: 801-422-6342
Email: marc_killpack [at] byu.edu

Office Hours: MWF 2:00pm-3:00pm 360E EB
Research Topics:

Soft Robots, Human-Robot Interaction, Controls, Robot Manipulation, Computer vision and 3D Sensing, Haptic Sensing

Background:

Marc Killpack completed his Ph.D. in Robotics from the Georgia Institute of Technology and joined BYU as an Assistant Professor in December of 2013.  His areas of expertise include controls, mechanics and perception for robotics and other automated systems.  His current research interests relate to improving modeling and control for robot manipulation in unstructured and difficult environments.  This includes applications related to search and rescue, disaster response, soft robots, and human robot interaction.  While at Georgia Tech in the Healthcare Robotics Lab (HRL), Marc worked on projects including sensing and control for mobile robot bases, automating learning from robot grasping, manipulation around and interacting with human subjects, and control of a robot arm in cluttered and unmodeled environments.  Prior to joining HRL, he completed Masters degrees in Mechanical Engineering from both Georgia Tech and AM Paris Tech (formerly ENSAM) in Metz, France.  In 2007, Marc graduated with a Bachelor's of Science in Mechanical Engineering from Brigham Young University.

Link: Lab Website
Link: Personal Website
Spencer P. Magleby Spencer P. Magleby
Professor

Ph.D. University of Wisconsin-Madison

Faculty Profile

Office: 350 Maeser Building
Office Phone: 801-422-3151
Email: magleby [at] byu.edu

Office Hours: By appointment.
Research Topics:

Engineering Design, Product Development, Compliant Mechanisms

Background:

Professor Magleby came to BYU in 1989 after 6 years in the military aircraft industry developing tools for advanced aircraft design and manufacture, concurrent engineering methods, and interdisciplinary design teams. At BYU he has pursued research in design of products that use new mechanism technologies, design tools and processes that bridge engineering and business, and engineering team formation and management. Dr. Magleby teaches design at the graduate and undergraduate level, and is interested in educational partnerships with industry. He has helped oversee more than 200 undergraduate and graduate design projects through his involvement with the Capstone and Interdisciplinary Product Development programs. He has been nationally recognized for his contributions in engineering design education. Dr. Magleby currently serves as the Associate Dean of the Fulton College of Engineering and Technology.

Link: BYU Compliant Mechanisms Research
Christopher Mattson Christopher A. Mattson
Professor

Ph.D. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Faculty Profile

Office: 360C EB
Office Phone: 801-422-6544
Email: mattson [at] byu.edu

Office Hours: By Appointment
Research Topics:

Product Development, Design for the Developing World, Engineering Design Theory and Methodology, Multiobjective and Multidisciplinary Design Optimization

Background:

Christopher A. Mattson directs BYU's Design Exploration Research Group, which is focused on creating design tools and method that assist engineers in developing products that have the greatest possible benefit to humanity.  He is a graduate of Brigham Young University (BS 99, MS 01) and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (PhD 03), an inventor on multiple patents, and he has authored dozens of journal publications on the topics of design and optimization. He is an NSF CAREER awardee and a Fulbright Scholar, and was given a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) by President Obama in 2011. He is the recipient of ASME's 2015 Ben C. Sparks award for his educational work in building a strong senior design experience for BYU students.

Dr. Mattson was born and raised in the San Francisco Bay Area. As an engineer, he designed multiple products in the consumer electronics space, which have now been used by over 35 million people. He loves to travel and explore new cultures. He loves photography and any outdoor activity. He’s visited more than 40 countries to study or practice engineering design and has lived abroad three times; Brazil (1994-1996), China (2004-2005), and the United Kingdom (2014-2015). He and his wife Melissa have four children.

Link: Research Lab Website
Link: Google Scholar Profile
Link: CV (pdf download)
Link: Portfolio (pdf download)
R. Daniel Maynes R. Daniel Maynes
Professor and Department Chair

Ph.D. University of Utah

Faculty Profile

Office: 360B EB
Email: maynes [at] byu.edu

Office Hours: By appointment only; please contact Joanie Nelson at (801) 422-4372 or joan_nelson [at] byu.edu
Research Topics:

Superhydrophobic Surface Flow Physics and Thermal Transport; Microscale Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Transport; Cavitation in Liquid Flows; Train Aerodynamics; Elecroosmotic Flow and Heat Transport; Turbomachinery CFD and Analysis; Supersonic Jet Acoustics

Background:

Daniel Maynes joined the Mechanical Engineering Department in August 1997. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Utah, where, prior to his appointment at BYU he was a post-doctoral research professor and instructor. Other experience includes employment with the Space Dynamics Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory. Professor Maynes teaches Fluid Mechanics at the undergraduate level in addition to Incompressible Flow, Compressible Flow, and Convective Heat Transfer at the graduate level. Professor Maynes’ research interests are in superhydrophobic surface fluid flow physics and thermal transport, micro scale fluid mechanics and convection heat transfer, electro-osmotic transport dynamics; laser based experimental measurement methodologies and CFD of turbomachines.

 

Link: BYU FLUIDS LAB
Tim McLain Tim McLain
Professor

Ph.D. Stanford University

Faculty Profile

Office: 350H EB
Office Phone: 801-422-6537
Email: mclain [at] byu.edu

Office Hours: MWF 2:00pm-3:00pm ,
Office Hours: By Appointment . Please contact mclain [at] byu.edu for appointment
Research Topics:

Dynamic systems, control system design; guidance, dynamics, control, and autonomy of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS).

Background:

Tim McLain has taught in the Mechanical Engineering Department at Brigham Young University since 1995. After completing his MS degree at BYU, he worked for two years with Sarcos, Inc. in Salt Lake City on the design, modeling, and control of fluid-power systems for robotics applications. While completing his PhD work at Stanford University, Professor McLain worked with the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute on the control of underwater robotic vehicles. Since joining BYU, he has been actively involved in the control of hydraulic actuation systems and microelectro-mechanical systems (MEMS). During the summers of 1999 and 2000, he was a visiting scientist at the Air Force Research Laboratory where he initiated research in the cooperative control of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS). Currently, he is the director of the NSF-sponsored Center for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (C-UAS), which in partnership with the University of Colorado and Virginia Tech, perform industry-sponsored research related to UAS.

Link: BYU MAGICC LAB
Link: Center for Unmanned Aircraft Systems
Troy Munro Troy Munro
Assistant Professor

Ph.D. Utah State University and Katholieke University

Faculty Profile

Office: 350E EB
Office Phone: 801-422-6541
Email: troy.munro [at] byu.edu

Office Hours: MWF 1:00pm - 2:00pm,
Office Hours: or By Appointment
Research Topics:

Heat Transfer, Thermal Behavior of Materials, Fluorescence Thermometry, Biophotonics, Thermal Transport, Nuclear Energy, Thermophysical Properties 

Background:

Troy R. Munro joined the Mechanical Engineering department at BYU as an assistant professor in 2016.  He received a concurrent BS/MS from Utah State University in 2012 and a dual PhD from Utah State University and the Katholieke Universeit (KU) Leuven in 2016 in both Mechanical Engineering and Physics. His background is in microgravity boiling behavior with NASA, thermal properties of natural and synthetic spider silk, and fluorescence thermometry. His research is focused on the thermal behavior of materials and energy systems, along with developing the instrumentation needed to measure these systems. Current specific research areas include development of improved non-contact in situ temperature sensing systems, understanding boiling heat transfer behavior during accident conditions in nuclear reactors, thermal properties of materials, and phase changes in materials. He is excited to be work with such great students at BYU.

Link: Thermal, Energy, and Material Properties (TEMP) Lab
S. Andrew Ning
Assistant Professor

Ph.D. Stanford University

Faculty Profile

Office: 360F EB
Office Phone: 801-422-1815
Email: aning [at] byu.edu

Office Hours: M 2-3, Tu 4-5, F 12-1
Research Topics:

Aerodynamics, Multidisciplinary Design Optimization, Aircraft Design, Wind Energy

Background:

Andrew Ning joined the BYU Mechanical Engineering Department in 2014. His research focuses on aerodynamics and multidisciplinary optimization with applications in aircraft design and wind energy. Prior to joining BYU, he was a Senior Engineer and a Postdoctoral Researcher at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). At NREL he lead research studies in wind turbine design optimization and developed open-source tool sets for wind turbine aero/structural analysis. He received his Ph.D. (2011) and M.S. (2008) degrees from Stanford University in the Aeronautics & Astronautics Department. His dissertation focused on the aerodynamics and performance of flying transport aircraft in formation. As a recipient of the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship, he also conducted research in multifidelity optimization algorithms and design optimization of tailless aircraft. In 2006, he received a B.S. degree Magna Cum Laude and with University Honors from Brigham Young University in Applied Physics.

Link: FLOW Lab
Alan R. Parkinson Alan R. Parkinson
Professor

Ph.D. University of Illinois

Faculty Profile

Office: 360K EB
Office Phone: 801-422-6318
Email: parkinson [at] byu.edu

Office Hours: M 2:00pm - 3:00pm; TTh 9:00am - 10:00am
Research Topics:

Robust Design, Optimization Methods in Design, Smart Assemblies

Background:

Alan R. Parkinson was appointed Dean of the Fulton College of Engineering and Technology in May 2005. Before his appointment as Dean, he served as an associate dean and also as chair of the Mechanical Engineering Department. Dr. Parkinson received his PhD from University of Illinois in 1982 and has taught at BYU since then. His research interests center on methods and software to improve engineering design productivity, with a special emphasis on optimization methods, including optimization algorithms, robust design and large scale optimization.

Other areas of interest include design for manufacture and artificial intelligence applied to engineering design. He is a co-author of a commercial optimization software package, called OptdesX, which has been used at many companies and universities in the United States and Europe. He has been a consultant to many companies regarding applying optimization methods to their products. He recently received the Design Automation Award from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers for his work in robust design and design optimization.

John L. Salmon John L. Salmon
Assistant Professor

Ph.D. Georgia Institute of Technology

Faculty Profile

Office: 360D EB
Office Phone: 801-422-7135
Email: johnsalmon [at] byu.edu

Office Hours: By Appointment
Research Topics:

Systems Engineering, Design, and Integration, Multi-disciplinary Design Optimization, Multi-agent Multi-objective Decision Making, Parametric Design Methodology Development, Virtual Reality, Data Analytics

Background:

John Salmon currently works as an assistant professor at BYU in the Mechanical Engineering department. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Electrical Engineering at the University of Calgary and Utah State University respectively, and then received M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Aerospace Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. As a Research Engineer at the Aerospace Systems Design Laboratory for four years he worked with a variety of industry partners and government agencies including Lockheed Martin, General Electric, FedEx, UTRC/Sikorsky, NASA, AFRL, ARL, and NAVAIR. His research interests include systems engineering, design, and integration, multi-disciplinary optimization, operations research, visual and data analytics, modeling and simulation, multi-agent multi-objective decision making, sports analytics, virtual reality, and uncertainty analysis.

Link: Open Access Solar
Link: CAD Lab
Link: BESD Lab
Carl D. Sorensen Carl D. Sorensen
Professor

Ph.D. Mass. Institute of Technology

Faculty Profile

Office: 350F EB
Office Phone: 801-422-6397
Email: c_sorensen [at] byu.edu

Office Hours: MWF 10:00am - 11:00am,
Office Hours: By Appointment
Research Topics:

Friction Stir Welding, Design Team Formation Methods, Effects of Manufacturing Process Variation in Design

Background:

Carl Sorensen is Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director of the Capstone Program. He received his Ph.D. in Materials Science from MIT and has worked as a consultant in manufacturing processes for General Electric and Chrysler, as well as numerous smaller companies. He received the 2015 Ben C. Sparks Medal from ASME for his work in supporting design, build, and test education through the BYU Capstone program.  He is the recipient of the 2015 Alumni Professorship Award from Brigham Young University, and received the B. Keith Duffin Teaching and Learning Fellowship from BYU from 2007 to 2010.

Professor Sorensen is the author of more than 50 scholarly articles and four handbook chapters.  He has co-authored a book on product development with Christopher A. Mattson that is currently in the publication process.  He is working on a handbook for Friction Stir Welding with Tracy W. Nelson. 

Scott Thomson Scott Thomson
Professor

Ph.D. Purdue University

Faculty Profile

Office: 350B EB
Office Phone: 801-422-4980
Email: thomson [at] byu.edu

Office Hours: By Appointment
Research Topics:

Experimental and computational fluid mechanics and fluid-structure interactions; flow and elasticity in nature; biomechanics of human and animal voice production.

Background:

Dr. Thomson joined the BYU faculty in 2004. He received bachelor’s and master’s degrees in mechanical engineering from BYU (‘99, ‘00) and a PhD in mechanical engineering from Purdue University (‘04). From 2014 to 2016 he taught mechanical engineering at BYU-Idaho. He and his wife and their six children lived in Erlangen, Germany from 2011 to 2012 while he was a visiting faculty member at the Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg. He was also a visiting faculty researcher at Wright Patterson Air Force Base during the summer of 2008.

Dr. Thomson and his students are currently primarily focused on researching the biomechanics of human voice production. More broadly, he is interested in studying systems in nature in which fluid motion and structural elasticity are coupled. He is, or has been, a principal or co-investigator on over $7 million in external research grants, primarily from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD, a component of the National Institutes of Health, NIH), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR).

He teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in engineering measurement systems, computational fluid dynamics, and experimental fluids. He is a past Associate Editor for the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research (JSLHR) and currently serves on the International Advisory Board of the Advances in Quantitative Laryngology conference series. He is a past recipient of the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship and the ASME Graduate Teaching Fellowship.

Dr. Thomson was born and raised in Idaho, lived in New Zealand from 1992 to 1994, is semi-conversant in Tongan, and enjoys spending time with his family, traveling, and distance running.

Dale R. Tree Dale R. Tree
Professor and Associate Chair

Ph.D. University of Wisconsin-Madison

Faculty Profile

Office: 450A EB
Office Phone: 801-422-8306
Email: treed [at] byu.edu

Office Hours: By Appointment
Research Topics:

Combustion, Optical Diagnostics

Background:

Dale R. Tree is a Professor in Mechanical Engineering and has taught at Brigham Young University since 1994. In addition to working at BYU, Dr. Tree has worked two years as a Senior Engineer at Cummins Engine Company (studying the effects of high pressure fuel injection on diesel combustion) and completed a year of research at Sandia National Laboratory in Livermore, California (using optical diagnostics to understand soot formation processes in a diesel engine). Currently, Dr. Tree is working on projects involving oxyfuel combustion and ash deposition in coal and biomass systems.

Brent W. Webb Brent W. Webb
Professor and AVP

Ph.D. Purdue University

Faculty Profile

Office: 360G EB
Office Phone: 801-422-6543
Email: webb [at] byu.edu

Office Hours: By appointment.
Research Topics:

Heat Transfer, Thermodynamics

Background:

Brent W. Webb joined the Mechanical Engineering faculty in 1986 after receipt of his PhD at Purdue University. In his final year as a graduate student, he was named a National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator.

He has served as an Associate Technical Editor of the ASME Journal of Heat Transfer, and is currently Associate Technical Editor of the Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer.  He has also served as a member of the AIAA National Thermophysics Committee, the TC-21 (Modeling) Committee of the International Congress on Glass, and on the scientific committee for a number of international symposia.  He recently chaired the 6th International Symposium on Radiative Transfer held in Antalya, Turkey.  

Professor Webb’s research activities have included exploration of high heat flux liquid jet impingement heat transfer, heat transfer in industrial scale furnaces, fluid flow and heat transfer in micro channels, and characterization of radiation properties of foams. Software developed for modeling the detailed thermal transport in glass melting furnaces has been used in both the U.S. and Japan. His work on new modeling approaches for predicting spectral radiation heat transfer in high temperature gases has been adopted worldwide.

Professor Webb is the author/co-author of some 200 publications, has lectured extensively both in the U.S. and abroad, and has directed over $5 million in research activity.